Humor: The eggheads KILLED the mannequin challenge

LAURA LONG / AGGIE
LAURA LONG / AGGIE

headshot_blThe UC Davis eggheads try to take advantage of a dying internet trend

The mannequin challenge came and went within a couple of weeks — the typical lifespan for internet trends. Its decline probably seems obvious to most casual observers, though it is likely that Ellen DeGeneres will continue to participate for several more weeks, even if she is the only one, and it’s slightly depressing to watch.

In similar fashion, the eggheads are unaware that the hype around the challenge seems to be dying down. This is understandable, however, since the eggheads are only able to hear news by eavesdropping on students who happen to walk by.

The iconic statues recently heard about the mannequin challenge and set out to acquire internet fame.

“We felt that we could really bring something special to this challenge,” said one of the eggheads who, in addition to being a well-known statue on UC Davis’ campus, is also a parkour enthusiast. “We’re pretty good at standing still, I would say. I think it’s because we do a lot of yoga and we’re really in touch with not only our bodies, but also our souls. You probably wouldn’t get it. It doesn’t hurt that we’re made of stone and anchored to the ground, but I think it’s mostly because of the yoga.”

The eggheads filmed their mannequin challenge in front of the art building. They say it went “viral” on YouTube, amassing tens of views in a matter of weeks.

“It’s truly an honor to have our video be so well-received and critically acclaimed,” said the second egghead, a straw wrapper collector.

It is possible that the egghead was referring to the single comment left on the pair’s YouTube video: “How did I even find this video?”

The pair of statues told The California Aggie that they are excited for what their video will do for the “egg community.”

“You know, Humpty Dumpty is constantly being talked about, and all he did was fall off a wall or something. That’s not heroic. Standing still in a video while participating in a dying internet fad is heroic. We’re thrilled that we can be positive role models for all the young eggs out there. I just wish the hen who gifted us to the world could see us now. She’d be so proud.”

Written by: Brian Landry — bjlandry@ucdavis.edu