Vegan Eats at the CoHo

FARAH FARJOOD / AGGIE

What’s available for vegan eaters at this quintessential UC Davis eatery?

“If I was a picky eater, I don’t think I could be vegan,” said Danny O’Brien, a vegan and first-year environmental science and management major. “Your options can be limited at times, but that comes with being vegan.”

Indeed, eating vegan restricts the variety of foods you can consume. Restaurant options and eating non-home-cooked meals can also become a hassle. And for busy college students, quick on-the-go options are a must. The popular Coffee House in the center of campus is often the spot for such meals, but what are the options for vegan students?

“At the CoHo, we have vegan options in every restaurant,” said Lily Johnson, a third-year sociology major and a CoHo employee. “Some restaurants have more options than others, but we are told in the training process what is vegan and what is not vegan. Everything we serve is labeled vegan or not. If we have any questions we can ask the supervisor, but all the information is provided to us.”

Johnson named specific vegan options at Swirlz including chocolate chip cookies, snowball cookies, almond shortbread, coconut fudge bars and cupcakes. One of the most popular options there is the vegan peanut butter Rice Krispie treats.

“Our deli bread is also vegan except for the greek yogurt bun, and you can put veggies on to make a vegan sandwich,” Johnson said. “The tofu salad is also vegan.”

In O’Brien’s opinion, TxMx is a good CoHo option for vegans.

“TxMx is actually good because you can substitute beans instead of meat, and the meal actually fills you up rather than just a salad at Croutons,” O’Brien said. “I also like the tofu chili at Cooks and bagels with avocado spread.”

Staple foods for vegans include beans, hummus and avocado, according to O’Brien, which can be provided and substituted at most restaurants in the CoHo.

“Really the only restaurant that is off-limits for vegans is the the pizza place, Ciao,” O’Brien said.

For vegan Samy Richards, a fourth-year design major who worked at the CoHo last year, staples like nuts, grains, beans and vegetables make up her diet.

“I either eat vegetable sushi, a vegetarian sandwich with dairy-free bread or a salad from Croutons,” Richards said. “I never have had a problem eating at the CoHo or accommodating for customers when I used to work at the CoHo.”

Johnson agreed that CoHo employees are eager to help vegan patrons navigate the different options at the CoHo — all one has to do is ask.

“We at the CoHo are all more than happy to help. It is never an extra hassle to accommodate for a vegan customer,” Johnson said. “I think we do the best we can, but we are always open to more suggestions to make things more welcome to vegan eaters.”
Written by: Caroline Rutten — arts@theaggie.org