Call for termination of Professor Clover, YoloAlert, If Trees Could Talk: Your Weekly Briefing

Happy last Friday of Winter Quarter, Aggies!

Week 10 has come to a close, we made it… and now for finals week. Sending good study vibes — make sure to get plenty of rest and take advantage of the nice weather by enjoying a study break in the sun. Go grab another cup of coffee, Aggies, and hit those books!

Here’s what you need to know this week…

Photo of the Week:

TREVOR GOODMAN / AGGIE

In Campus News:

California Assemblyman James Gallagher called for the termination of UC Davis professor Joshua Clover who tweeted, “I am thankful that every living cop will one day be dead.” This call for the removal of professor Clover arose from an article Aggie columnist Nick Irvin published last month which gained national attention. This anti-cop rhetoric is not an isolated situation, in an interview Clover said, “People think that cops need to be reformed. They need to be killed.” Gallagher presented a petition signed by 10,000 individuals at a press conference outside Mrak Hall on Wednesday. Read more.

MICHAEL LEAHY / AGGIE

In City News:

Davis Police urged Davis residents to sign up for YoloAlert, a new countywide alert system, after WarnMe malfunctioned following the Natalie Corona shooting. This Everbridge platform is being encouraged because social media alerts, which were employed to notify residents during the Corona manhunt, fail to reach a majority of the community. The YoloAlert system will also include notifications for events such as flood warnings, unexpected road closures and missing person reports. Read more.

JOSH MOY / AGGIE

Features:

UC Davis students shared the effects of social media on their college experiences. Today’s technology increases communication and allows for people to connect across geographic separation, but social media can foster habitual phone-checking.“There’s no universal rule that says, ‘Oh, social media is bad,’” said Kush Patel, a fifth-year computer science major. “I think it comes down to the mindset of the person using it, whether they are easily distracted or they’re not stable in the sense that, if someone says something crazy in a group chat, they might lose it.” Read more.

ZOË REINHARDT / AGGIE

Arts:

“If Trees Could Talk” — if you’ve caught a glimpse of your reflection in a tree on campus, you’re not imagining it. As part of an art installation project, Maxine Aiello has installed mirrors in tree hollows around the UC Davis campus. Below the mirrors are dog tags attached to the trees to “demonstrate personal responsibility in environmental degradation.”

“At this point, a lot of information had come out about how bad our climate is doing and  how scary it is that our planet is going down this path,” Aiello said. “I was just overwhelmed with the idea that we were kind of on this unstoppable path, and people weren’t really paying attention to it. So the messages I was adding to the trees ended up being my way to get people to think about the planet and think about what they’re doing, how they’re affecting it, what they can do and kind of finally take some personal responsibility for their role in our future.” Read more.

WAYNE TILCOCK / AGGIEPHOTO.COM

Sports:

Grace Richards, a senior Lacrosse goalie, shared her story about changing positions. “[The transition] has given me the power to be able to look at things in a positive light that may not be positive or taking something and thinking, ‘what could I have done better?’ Richards said. “It’s made me more accountable as an athlete, as a person, as a student and I think that that’s the biggest thing this role change has given me, and I couldn’t thank anybody more.” Her goalie coach Emi Smith, a former All-American goalkeeper at Penn State, and her brother, who was also a collegiate lacrosse goalkeeper, guided Richards in the transition from attacker to goalie

CHAUDHARI LAB / UC DAVIS

Science:

A team of researchers is studying the movement of wrist bones. Wrist function is vital in everyday activities like using our phones and opening doors, but knowledge is limited on how the wrist bones move together. Using MRI scans, the team is creating a model to better understand and develop treatments for those with wrist issues. Read more.

Opinion:

Letters to the EditorCommunity members react to Professor Joshua Clover’s statement that cops “need to be killed”

Editorial:Student loans make up majority of young Americans’ debt

Column: The millennial left’s dangerous disinterest in the Trump-Russia scandal

Clay’s Weekly Pics:

Television:Lovecraft Country”

Movie: “MidSommar”

Novel: “Riot. Strike. Riot.”

Album: “The Sky’s Gone Out”

More…

That’s all for this week, Aggies. We are taking next week off, but check back in two Friday’s for a recap of the best stories from Winter Quarter.

Have a bangin’ Spring Break!

— Grace Simmons

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