Indigenous ceremonial objects misused, Tax Day, Battle of the Bands: Your Weekly Briefing

Happy Friday, Aggies!

Another Picnic Day for the books, congratulations for surviving, Aggies. Things are starting to heat up — Some Tahoe slopes are set to close Easter Sunday, but Squaw Valley is going strong and is not set to close until after the first week in July. Today marks the close of week three, midterms again, already!?

For those celebrating Passover and Easter, have a wholesome weekend, and for those celebrating 4/20 and going to Coachella Weekend 2, maybe not so much…

Here’s your news…

JUSTIN HAN / AGGIE

Story of the Week:

UC Davis’ Morgan Bertsch drafted to WNBA — the first woman to be drafted in Aggie history. With 2,422 career points, she also is the highest scoring player in UC Davis women’s basketball history. Bertsch was selected 29th overall by the Dallas Wings on Thursday, becoming one of the 36 women to be chosen worldwide. “It still blows my mind. It doesn’t really seem real that it actually happened,” Bertsch said. Read on.

LUIS LOPEZ / AGGIE

Campus:

Art challenges indigenous identity — “Our religion is not art. It never has been,” said Native American elder and Davis resident Susan Reece in response to the Xicanx Futurity exhibition at the Manetti Shrem Museum. Ceremonial indigenous objects such as eagle feathers and tobacco ties were on display as part of the exhibit, which are forbidden uses of ceremonial objects according to the The Native American Studies (NAS) department at UC Davis. Reece alleged that the NAS department wasn’t consulted about the exhibition. The feathers have since been removed from the exhibit and a symposium will be held to address the issue and open dialogue regarding the complaints. Read on.

TESSA KOGA / AGGIE

City:

Kaiser Permanente to negotiate contracts with 85,000 healthcare workers — resuming negotiations that were halted by the healthcare corporation in early 2018, workers are pushing for higher wages and better conditions. The Coalition of Kaiser Permanente Union (CKPU) is returning to the table to secure a national agreement after Kaiser recently dropped a ban that prohibited employees from speaking out against patient care issues and being politically engaged. Read on.  

JEREMY DANG / AGGIE

Features:

Taxes — “It’s a b**** to fill out all the forms,” said Daniel Painter, a second-year biochemistry and molecular biology major. Tax season concluded earlier this week and for many students this year was their first time filing. What is a 1040, a W-2 form? These key components of filing your taxes are seldom taught in public high schools, leaving young tax virgins clueless. Students share their knowledge about taxes, or lack thereof, read on.

NATALIE MEVISES_COURTESY

Arts:

Battle of the Bands — ASUCD Entertainment Council to host seven bands on April 27. The top three teams will compete for a chance to perform at a future event of their choosing: the Davis Whole Earth Festival, Operation Restore Maximum Freedom and an EC Local Limelight. Each band will perform a 20-minute set that will be judged by the audience. The musical dual will take place in the CoHo from 5:30 to 11 p.m., tickets are $5 presale and $7 at the door. Read about the bands.

QUINN SPOONER / AGGIE FILE

Sports:

Aggies v. Mustangs — Aggie softball victory, Aggie baseball loss. Brooke Yanez, sophomore Aggie pitcher, fired a no-hitter in Sunday’s game against Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. This closed out the series against Cal Poly with a win for the Aggies. Read the full recap.

UC Davis baseball lost 5-6 in their Picnic Day game against Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, losing the three game series. Aggies continue their Big West Conference against UCSB. Read on.

COURTESY

Science:

CalTeach — a Mathematics and Science Teaching Program for UC Davis STEM students looking to pursue a career in K-12 education. The program includes internships for students to volunteer in community schools which is advantageous when applying for teaching credential programs after graduation. This program not only supports STEM students in becoming teachers, but given the lack of elementary school teachers with math and science backgrounds, it has the power to make a significant difference in K-12 education.

“I’d get paid more doing something else, but for me, I think teaching is an amazing opportunity to make an impact,” Jeffery Harvey said, a CalTeach/MAST alumni. “It’s a great place for people with higher degrees to end up because you get to expose one hundred human beings every year to your science knowledge.” Harvey teaches AP Physics. Read on.

Culture Corner — Alyssa’s Weekly Picks

Television: “Shrill”

Movie: “Matilda”

Novel: “The Book Thief”

Album: “Make My Bed” by King Princess

Read about them.

Opinion — The Andrew Yang phenomenon

Editorial — California municipalities send marijuana convictions up in smoke

That’s all for this week, Aggies. Check back next week.

— Grace Simmons