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Davis

Davis, California

Wednesday, October 20, 2021

Upcoming events in Davis

Live music, art exhibits and more to check out in Davis this October

“Manetti Shrem Museum of Art” (254 Old Davis Road, 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Thursday and Friday and 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday):

The Manetti Shrem has extended hours this fall, just in time for students back in person to get an eyeful of its new exhibits, such as “Wayne Thiebaud Influencer: A New Generation,” which brings together 19 contemporary artists who have been inspired by UC Davis’ own centennial professor emeritus and “New Flavors: Collected at the Candy Store,” an exhibit inspired by a Folsom gallery that started the careers of dozens of Sacramento artists.

“Davis Jazz Night” (521 1st. St., 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m, last Friday of each month):

If you’ve got a rip-roaring itch for some live Jazz, be sure to check out the Davis Jazz Night, a regular event at the John Natsoulas Art Gallery in which the New Harmony Jazz Band will be performing for free. 

“Traditional and New Music for Koto” (Anne E. Pitzer Center, 12:05 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. on October 14): 

This is a rare chance to see a performance on the koto, Japan’s national instrument — a huge half-tube covered by 13 heightened strings of varied length. In this short performance, Shoko Hikage, a Sacramento koto player, will demonstrate the instrument’s unique sound with four pieces from the past and present.

“The Basement Gallery Presents: Darkness Within” (Art Building Room 60, 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, Exhibit opens October 8):

If your art tastes run a touch more on the spooky side, check out this pop-up show from the Basement Gallery and get your shiver on in time for Halloween. And if you’re an artist, be on the lookout for future Basement Gallery shows to which you may want to submit your work.

“Liszt Transcriptions of the Nine Beethoven Symphonies” (Jackson Hall, 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. on November 6):

Performed by the supremely talented Christopher Taylor, the Liszt Transcriptions of Beethoven’s symphonies have enjoyed a reputation as some of the greatest piano pieces ever written. This is just the first performance of a series, so if you miss it, there are plenty more opportunities to get a listen of Taylor’s playing.

Written by: Jacob Anderson — arts@theaggie.org

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