Significant snapshots

Aggie photographers share some of their most cherished photographs.

I will always consider Hong Kong to be home, but even then I never felt connected to the city. This shot was taken on my film camera in Mong Kok, an older district of the city. To me, photographing these scenes of antiquity is how I connect to my city. (NICHOLAS CHAN)

 

 

This was my first DSLR photo taken in my backyard in San Diego. (FARAH FARJOOD)

 

I’m so thankful to have the opportunity to travel and visit so many places at such a young age. Exploring the worlds will always be a passion of mine. (ALEXA FONTANILLA)

 

I took this photo on my trip to Italy over the summer with my first DSLR camera. This trip was special to me because having the opportunity to travel and see so many scenic places truly influenced me to learn more about photography to be better able to capture photos of future explorations. (SAHAR FOROUZANFAR)

 

Not only does this photo unite people with the wonderful creatures that are dogs, it captures pure happiness. I wasn’t feeling like my best self during this time but I was fortunate enough to escape to Lake Tahoe after being away from these friends for awhile. The moment after I took this photo I lit up and everything felt a little bit better and brighter. The smiles from my friends and the dog’s loving gaze are all so genuine and so was that moment. There is nothing quite like capturing a moment of pure joy especially when a dog is involved. (KELSEY GREGGE)

 

I shot this on 35mm film back home this past winter break in Los Angeles. Sitting on the bluffs of San Pedro was a man who brought with him his own chair and solitude; walking behind him, I was able to frame this shot as he looked out over the Pacific ocean, and continued to do so for another hour. (IAN JONES)

 

This is a photo I took at the Women’s March in January. It was incredible event where I saw so many people come together to stand against something they felt was wrong, and I’ll never forget the experience. In this photo, a young marcher holds up a sign that reads “Future Madame President.” Even though you can’t see, the girl in the photo was showing another young girl her sign and they shared a really special moment that I think encapsulates what was so amazing about the movement. It was about bringing people together and inspiring each other to look toward the future to get through difficult times. (BRIAN LANDRY)

 

 

During my semester abroad in Singapore, I visited the iconic Rochor Centre, a residential estate built in 1977. It was once a lively hub full of shops, family gatherings, and freestyle soccer hobbyists. It was also slated for demolition by 2017. A number of residents and shops had already relocated to nearby towns, leaving behind dilapidated furniture and lingering memories of their old home. While standing on the deck, which was quiet beneath the hum of traffic and cooing pigeons, I was reminded of the finite amount of time I had to explore this new country. I may be back home in California, but the memories I made in Singapore are ones I will continue to cherish. (DIANA LI)

 

 

This is one of the first pictures I have taken of my sweet dog. Whenever I think of pictures that show improvements in my photography skills, I always think of photos like this one. Even though there are some things in this picture that could be improved, it just shows that there is always room to grow. My dog lifts my mood whenever I don’t feel like myself and will always be an inspiration to take pictures of. Since pictures are memories, I will always treasure them. (LAURA LONG)

 

This was taken in front of a wall at the death star. I tried to portray this idea of loneliness, but at the same time contrast that with all the colors in the background. That practically sums up my first year in college.In some ways it was lonely and confusing at times, but through friends (such as Sedona right here), family, and exploring myself I learned a lot about who I am. That’s another reason the colors are there and part of the reason why the yellow and light tone of green is on the right and darker green on the left; Although loneliness can leave us in a box, being able to be positive and go through this journey of being lonely can lead to a realization of our true colors and who we are as individuals, moving from a dark space (left side) where loneliness and fear can rise to a lighter and brighter side (the right) where you find who you are and through that journey you find love (red/pink) and sadness (blue). Her face just sums up all this. The sun had hit her face and she couldn’t see for a sec and it’s kind of like how college hits us right in the face and we make this face of like agony and confusion because that’s how it feels for a second, being out here away from family and our homes. Overall, even though the sun (college) can be blinding, that can never stop us. That’s what it feels like; getting smacked in the face with this totally different experience and through this comes being lonely and fear, but at the end of it all we are able to find love for ourselves, find our true colors, and portray ourselves through what we love. I mean, that’s college, right? (RAUL MORALES)

 

It’s scary to think how fast four years here can fly by. I remember visiting campus as a 12-year-old with my parents (both UC Davis alumni), somehow knowing instinctively that this is where I wanted to go to college. 10 years later, I am graduating from UC Davis. Thank you, UC Davis, for all of the memories, learning experiences and opportunities. (CIERA PASTUREL)

 

Bëë (right) passed away list last week. This photoshoot was taken the day prior to her passing. I had never had guinea pigs prior. She rubbed off on me in a big way and I grew very close to her. Her personality was one of a kind and she will be missed. (JORDAN KNOWLES)

 

This is a photo taken several years ago, I was coming back from a family road trip and saw this interesting looking shed as I sat in the passenger seat. I snapped a few shots, and since I was sitting in a moving car I really didn’t think it would amount to much, but when I looked back at it I’m still amazed at my sheer luck. I wouldn’t have been able to compose it any better even if I was standing in front of the shed. It’s ultimately one of the photos that continue to inspire my photography. (JERO REAL)

 

This was one of the first photographs I took. I’ve always wished I would run into the surfer so I can give him copies of the photos I took of him. (ZOË REINHARDT)

 

My younger brother (the taller one) and I didn’t have the best relationship growing up. This photo was taken during a family trip to Hawaii last summer when we finally started to get along and grow closer despite our history. This photo means a lot to me because it reminds me of the importance of family. (MEENA RUGH)

 

This was the first print I made in the darkroom. Rookie to proper image exposure times, contrast filters, the methods of dodging and burning, I can’t number how many test prints didn’t meet my satisfaction. Ultimately, it’s a pretty humble image, but so began my love for film photography. The laborious act of manually developing, cropping, editing, and enlarging is tactile and personal. The involvement of film photo removes the passivity of just taking a fast picture, and has made photography meaningful for me. (CAT TAYLOR)

 

This photograph represents my two greatest passions: photography and riding. Some of my favorite memories are with the UC Davis dressage team. I love that I got to share my passion and I hope I get to continue sharing it after I graduate. (NICOLE WASHINGTON)

 

 

Compiled by: The California Aggie Photo Desk — photo@theaggie.org