The Life of Pie: Improv comedy club Cherry Pie’s journey

The Life of Pie: Improv comedy club Cherry Pie’s journey

Photo Credits: ALLYSON KO / AGGIE

The brief history of how the newest improv group on campus came to be

Centered around the theme of Valentine’s Day, Cherry Pie, UC Davis’ self-described newest and sexiest improv team, put on a show on Feb. 15 that completely filled Young Hall’s room 194. The setlist included many performance pieces that can also be found at their practices and Improv Jams. They played games such as “World’s Worst,” where actors act out or say slogans that embody the worst versions of an occupation or company. The group also played a game called “Apartments,” a format that begins as three sets of two actors performing different scenes in adjoining “apartments” that then join together and intertwine each story.

The group’s Facebook page, which lists all of their upcoming shows, “jams” and improv opportunities, is quirky, fun and inviting – just like the group itself.

Third-year genetics and genomics major Hannah Haensel is a member of the club and attests to the familial nature of the group.

“Everyone on the team is so supportive when you try something new, and doing improv has really helped me be more confident in my daily life,” Haensel said.

The 12-member group takes their craft very seriously and dedicates two days a week for practices. On weeks with shows, they’ll often allocate even more time.

Even though this seems like a lot of time and effort to spend on anything, third-year computer science and technology management major Abhay Sawhney finds it all to be worth it.

“There’s literally no downside, practices are fun, I love performing and I love the people that are on the team, so what’s not to love?” Sawhney said.

Besides being just a friendly group of people, Cherry Pie works to make sure that improv is something to be enjoyed by all.

Many of the group’s members have only been doing improv since joining the team. Like Haensel and Sawhney, fourth-year biological science major Sarah Karels started improv for the first time when she joined Cherry Pie.  

Sawhney also credited the supportive and caring nature of the group.  

“It is fairly easy for anyone to show up and just do their best,” Sawhney said.

Haensel said that there “is absolutely no judgement and you can just be weird,” providing this as her reason for enjoying improv.

Whether in the audience or up with the Cherries performing, Karels said that “improv is fun whether you are doing it or watching it.”

Updates on Cherry Pie are available on its Facebook page. Make sure to check out a show or attend one of their impromptu improv jams for an easygoing and comedic experience that is sure to get introduce a group of people who are as sweet as pie.

Written by: Isabella Beristain— features@theaggie.org